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© Zuzana Vesela
© Roman Sedina
© Roman Sedina
© Jan Mahr3

Roman Šedina

Roman Šedina Ceramicist
Contact
Czech, English
Hours:
By appointment only
Phone:
+420 721432192
© Martin Kopecky

Finding beauty in imperfection

  • • Roman specialises in shaping deformaties
  • • He uses porcelain layering and sprayed ceramics
  • • He makes series of porcelain accessories

Roman Šedina's vases celebrate emptiness. Even without flowers, they are full of life, seeming to bear their nakedness proudly. It is as if the material is both a tool and a product. "When I first encountered clay, I was fascinated. The first touch, the initial trials and setbacks led me to strongly admire it, sparking an intense desire to comprehend this material, " Šedina's processing of clay is intriguing. Touching the objects, one can't tell the era of their genesis: simple shapes coated with a grainy, sometimes glazed texture, caked knots of clay and tangible imperfections. These could come from neolith, antiquity, present or even future. Decorated with distinctive colours, the vases exhibit their earthy origin with both modesty and pride.

Read the full interview

Works

  • © Roman Sedina
  • © Roman Sedina
  • © Roman Sedina
  • © Roman Sedina
  • © Roman Sedina
Photo: © Roman Sedina
Vase - Bushido Collection

This terracotta vase refers to today's forgotten fascination with ancient Japanese ceramics. The different colours are loosely inspired by the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam. The production of such a vase takes several hours of spinning on a potter's wheel. One dried gradual the vessel undergoes several firings, glazing and a sprayed coat of pigmented ceramic. A special effect is the small pieces of matter that Šedina intentionally leaves on the body of the vessel.

Height 55 cm

Roman Šedina Ceramicist
Photo: © Roman Sedina
Vase - Bushido Collection

Terracotta vases create deep dark structures and refer to today's forgotten fascination with ancient Japanese ceramics. The different colors are loosely inspired by the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam in the Netherlands. The production of such a vase takes several hours of spinning on a potter's wheel. Subsequent gradual drying is controlled until the process of several firing, glazing and spraying of the ceramic pigmented mass comes. A special effect is the small pieces of matter that Šedina intentionally leaves on the body of the container. It intentionally opens the process of production, incompleteness and imperfection to the viewer.

Height 60 cm

Roman Šedina Ceramicist
Photo: © Roman Sedina
Vase - Bushido Collection

This terracotta vase refers to today's forgotten fascination with ancient Japanese ceramics. The different colours are loosely inspired by the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam. The production of such a vase takes several hours of spinning on a potter's wheel. One dried gradual the vessel undergoes several firings, glazing and a sprayed coat of pigmented ceramic. A special effect is the small pieces of matter that Šedina intentionally leaves on the body of the vessel.

Height 60 cm

Roman Šedina Ceramicist
Photo: © Roman Sedina
Vase - Bushido Collection

This terracotta vase refers to today's forgotten fascination with ancient Japanese ceramics. The different colours are loosely inspired by the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam. The production of such a vase takes several hours of spinning on a potter's wheel. One dried gradual the vessel undergoes several firings, glazing and a sprayed coat of pigmented ceramic. A special effect is the small pieces of matter that Šedina intentionally leaves on the body of the vessel.

Height 60 cm

Roman Šedina Ceramicist
Photo: © Roman Sedina
Vase - Meadow Collection

Roman's personal collection of layered vases featuring blown and burnt decoration is unique in terms of its look and technology used. Its roots stretch back to the techniques used by ancient Japanese potters. And Roman has made these his own, giving the porcelain pieces a sense of ephemerality.

Roman Šedina Ceramicist

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