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Kika Hinari

Kika Hinari Ceramicist
Contact
Greek, English
Hours:
By appointment only
Phone:
+30 6972232255
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  • • Kika’s ceramic creations are extremely light and thin
  • • She designed a series of teapots for the Museum of Cycladic Art Shop
  • • The Attic peninsula's light has a meaningful influence on her work

With extreme delicacy, Kika Inari explores the luminosity and lightness of clay. The Greek ceramicist creates pottery objects, where the light of the Attica is expressed through the thinness of the material. Working mainly with the wheel and the coiling technique, the master craftswoman likes to experiment with this basic material to create beauty, and “to make people’s daily life a little better, and hers, of course”. Before pottery, Kika studied Geology, Photography and Music, which she believes contributed to her unique perception of ceramic. She finds inspiration all around her, in the light, the shadows, but also in cinema, the behaviour of people, and the emotions that words evoke in her, like poetry.

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Works

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“I am a pot” (a self-conscious vessel)

The "I am a pot" ceramic sculptures are beings that self-identify as vessels, created using the coiling technique. Traditionally, any organism living in a shell is considered as a “being”, but here the tables are turned. The sculpture is not a hull, rather an organism by its own right, whose growth in time becomes evident in the final result. The apparent traces of hand movement mark the aspiration of a non-being to be, as a continuance or evolution of life.

Length 22 cm

Kika Hinari Ceramicist
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Luminous Creatures

The artefacts of this hand built sculptural series, created from parian porcelain, symbolise creatures that communicate with each other emitting light and continually evolving their shape. Here the maker captures an ephemeral moment of this everlasting movement.

Length 20 cm

Kika Hinari Ceramicist
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Skin

Through this series of hand thrown vessels, Kika Hinari wanted to stress one of the most characteristic properties of clay: its plasticity. The clay bends under its own weight and thus gives the naturalistic feeling of human skin.

Height 15 cm

Kika Hinari Ceramicist
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Sunburst

Kika Hinari chose bright colours to decorate these vessels, inspired by the vivid imagery of the sun as it rises from the clouds, a special moment, when we have a sense of optimism and calmness. This thrown teapot set was commissioned and created for the Museum of Cycladic Art Shop.

Length 20 cm

Kika Hinari Ceramicist
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Traces of life gone by

In palaeontology there’s a field that studies the biological activity of a plant or animal, based on the traces they leave throughout their lives. Starting from an exploration into this area of study, Kika Hinari created this micaceous clay vessel as a trace fossil. Every part of the hand thrown vessel symbolizes an old residence of a being that once lived inside.

Height 20 cm

Kika Hinari Ceramicist

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