Michelangelo Foundation Homo Faber Event Guide
   Newsletter
Explore Discover Visit Experience About
© All rights reserved
© Evelyn Noval
© All rights reserved
© All rights reserved
© All rights reserved

Hans Henning Pedersen

Hans Henning Pedersen Woodturner
Contact
Danish, English, German
Hours:
By appointment only
Phone:
+45 20295519
© All rights reserved

The beauty of imperfection

  • • Hans Henning finds inspiration in nature
  • • He uses local wood, especially oak and beech
  • • Some of his bowls are only 3mm thin

Hans Henning Pedersen was born in 1950 on Bornholm island, in Denmark, where he still lives and works in the small fishing town of Gudhjem. He has been working as a carpenter, cabinetmaker and woodturner since 1975. His artworks show a deep respect toward nature and wood in particular. He works mainly with freshly felled tree trunks, and purposely chooses wood with imperfections and damage to highlight the beautifully imperfect nature of his chosen material. In 1972, after being employed as a carpenter, he opened his own studio in order to have the freedom of overseeing the entire creative process himself.

Read the full interview

Works

  • © All rights reserved
  • © All rights reserved
  • © All rights reserved
  • © All rights reserved
  • © All rights reserved
Photo: © All rights reserved
Bowl

This large wooden vessel was hand turned on a lathe from wet oak wood. The vessel assumed its final form as it dried. Because of the contraction of wood while it dries, working with wet wood can be quite complicated and unpredictable as the wood can crack while drying naturally.

Diameter 47 cm
Height 49 cm

Hans Henning Pedersen Woodturner
Photo: © All rights reserved
Bowl

This large wooden bowl was hand turned on a lathe from wet chestnut wood. It assumed its final form while drying. Because of the contraction of wood while it dries, working with wet wood can be quite complicated and unpredictable as the wood can crack while drying naturally. This bowl has not been heavily worked on after being turned, leaving the wood grain and holey surface apparent.

Diameter 38 cm
Height 62 cm

Hans Henning Pedersen Woodturner
Photo: © All rights reserved
Bowl

These four wooden bowls were hand turned on a lathe from wet maple wood. The vessels took on their final forms while drying. Hans Henning has left the natural qualities of wood apparent. Because of the natural contraction of wood while it dries, working with wet wood can be quite complicated and unpredictable as the wood can crack while drying naturally.

Diameter 22 cm
Height 23 cm

Hans Henning Pedersen Woodturner
Photo: © All rights reserved
Bowl

This large wooden bowl was hand turned on a lathe from wet oak wood. The vessel took on its final form while drying. Hans Henning has left the natural qualities of the wood apparent. Because of the contraction of wood while it dries, working with wet wood can be quite complicated and unpredictable as the wood can crack with drying naturally.

Diameter 43 cm
Height 51 cm

Hans Henning Pedersen Woodturner
Photo: © All rights reserved
Bowl

This large wooden vessel was hand turned on a lathe from wet ash wood. The vessel assumed its final form while drying. Because of the natural contraction of wood while it dries, working with wet wood can be quite complicated and unpredictable as the wood can crack while drying naturally. The natural swirling patterns of the ochre wood have been left apparent.

Diameter 52 cm
Height 48 cm

Hans Henning Pedersen Woodturner

You may also like

Download the app

Find all the Homo Faber Guide content at hand, save, like and much more!