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Max Brosi

Max Brosi Woodturner
Contact
English, German
Hours:
By appointment only
Phone:
+353 866090650
© All rights reserved

Pushing the limits of woodturning

  • • Max began working with wood at his grandfather’s bench aged four
  • • He likes the interesting distortion that comes from working with wet wood
  • • He uses techniques including sandblasting and charring wood

After the Charlie Hebdo bombings in 2015, Max Brosi made Freedom of Speech, which was exhibited at the American Association of Woodturners (AWW) symposium. This simple, cylindrical form had a rim protruding from one side. As the wet wood from which the piece was turned started to season, the rim opened like the beak of a duck. “But the beak had two rusty bolts passing through it, attempting to hold the beak closed. This represented the suppression of freedom of speech.” Brosi likes to explore the limits and capabilities of the wood lathe as an artistic tool. "I also greatly value the preservation of a traditional skill, which still relies on hand and eye in this digital age,” he says.

Read the full interview

Works

  • © Steve Rogers
  • © Steve Rogers
  • © Steve Rogers
  • © Steve Rogers
  • © Steve Rogers
Photo: © Steve Rogers
Leylandii Vessel I

Max’s vessels focus on simplicity, balance and the interaction between form, volume and texture. This hipped vessel was turned from green Leylandii Cypress, then charred to expose the smooth three-dimensional texture of the grain, where cracks have formed.

Height 300 mm
Diameter 280 mm

Max Brosi Woodturner
Photo: © Steve Rogers
Leylandii Vessel II

Max’s vessels focus on simplicity, balance and the interaction between form, volume and texture. This hipped vessel was turned from green Leylandii Cypress, then charred to expose the smooth three-dimensional texture of the grain, where cracks have formed.

Height 400 mm
Diameter 320 mm

Max Brosi Woodturner
Photo: © Steve Rogers
Intergalactic Explorer

This small oak sculpture was turned on a lathe, on several axes. Max turned green oak then charred the surface. The charring reveals the three-dimensional texture of the grain and causes it to crack.

Diameter 120 mm

Max Brosi Woodturner
Photo: © Steve Rogers
Which Planet Are We From, Dad?

This diptych of multi-axis carvings represents a father and son looking out into space. Both pieces were turned from green oak on a lathe, on several axes. The final shapes were charred with a blow torch, revealing the texture of the wood’s growth rings.

Diameter 120 mm
Diameter 300 mm

Max Brosi Woodturner
Photo: © Steve Rogers
Split Tube Form

This piece characterises a dialogue between maker and material. As green wood dries, the annual rings contract and the timber normally cracks. By incising a cut from the rim to the pith, Max has facilitated the wood’s need to split, while taking advantage of this quality to use as a sculptural element. Once the wood had fully seasoned, the piece was sandblasted to reveal its inner structure.

Height 230 mm
Diameter 120 mm

Max Brosi Woodturner

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