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© Cristina Schek
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Heidi Bjørgan

Heidi Bjørgan Ceramicist
Contact
Norwegian, English
Hours:
By appointment only
Phone:
+47 91157826
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A second chance to shine

  • • Heidi collects discarded objects and gives them a new life
  • • Her aim is to explore the aesthetic potential of these objects
  • • She experiments with mixing ceramic glazes

Heidi Bjørgan is a specialist in experimenting with glazes and abstract objects. “I collect overlooked objects – a lamp, an old bread tin with an interesting shape or knickknacks of low value which have been discarded. I give these forms a second chance in a new guise, in a new context and sometimes I even add a new function.” In 1993 she started her training at the Bergen Academy of Art and Design, going on to study industrial design, glass and ceramics in Stockholm, before an MA in Creative Curating back in Bergen. “No matter how I work, I have learned from excellent teachers and also from other artists. I'm never afraid to experiment, and a mistake can often create the best result.”

Read the full interview

Works

  • © Thor Brødreskift
  • © Thor Brødreskift
  • © Thor Brødreskift
  • © Thor Brødreskift
  • © Thor Brødreskift
Photo: © Thor Brødreskift
The Yellow Console

This yellow earthenware and stoneware console is part of a wider series inspired by the Zwinger palace in Dresden, Germany. The pieces draw on the architecture and technical extravagances of the Baroque palace, which was built in the early 18th century. Small, deformed ceramic jars, inspired by the works of George Ohr, are placed in various positions on top of the consoles.

Height 15 cm
Width 10 cm
Length 22 cm

Heidi Bjørgan Ceramicist
Photo: © Thor Brødreskift
Object 189

This earthenware vessel was wheel-thrown as a cylinder and then deformed by hand into its final sculptural form. The piece consists of three deformed parts glazed together in the kiln. The pink-glazed part acts as a handle, giving the overall piece the look of a pitcher.

Height 26 cm
Width 13 cm
Length 29 cm

Heidi Bjørgan Ceramicist
Photo: © Thor Brødreskift
Object 122

Heidi pressed stoneware through an extruder to give this ceramic sculpture its initial form. She then moulded it by hand into its final form. The openings and bulges are inspired by and reflect the sensuality of the body.

Height 14 cm
Width 15 cm
Length 20 cm

Heidi Bjørgan Ceramicist
Photo: © Thor Brødreskift
Pink mug

The starting point for this vivid-pink earthenware mug was a recycled plastic lampshade that Heidi found in a skip. Using it as the basis for the ceramic vase, she added another find: a small porcelain bird discovered in a charity shop. By covering the bird and the mug with the same pink glaze, she merged two separate pieces into one..

Height 30 cm
Width 12 cm
Length 18 cm

Heidi Bjørgan Ceramicist
Photo: © Thor Brødreskift
Object 334

This stoneware object was wheel-thrown as a cylinder then deformed, before being sculpted into this final porous form. The centre of the sculpture is split to reveal a bulging shape – a clear reference to the body and sensuality.

Height 15 cm
weight 7 cm
Length 8 cm

Heidi Bjørgan Ceramicist

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