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© Barbara Nanning
© Barbara Nanning
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© Tom Haartsen
© Barbara Nanning

Barbara Nanning

Barbara Nanning Glass sculptor
Contact
Dutch, English, French
Hours:
By appointment only
Phone:
+31 651231283
© Barbara Nanning

Made with intuition and imagination

  • • Barbara expresses herself through clay and glass
  • • Researching materials is at the heart of her work
  • • She seeks a balance between the static and the dynamic

Barbara Nanning is a Dutch ceramicist and glass artist. “I learned to throw on a wheel when I was eight years old. I had a wheel in my bedroom, right beside my bed, and later a small electric kiln. All my free time during my teenage years was spent happily practising throwing.” The invitation in 1995 from Royal Leerdam to make a series of unique pieces brought a great change in her career. In Leerdam she mostly made dishes and objects of colourless glass, in which she played with the thickness of the glass and its distorting effects. “The forms were a continuation of my ceramic idiom. Since then I have worked alternately in ceramics and glass, following my intuition and imagination.”

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Works

  • © All rights reserved
  • © All rights reserved
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  • © All rights reserved
  • © All rights reserved
Photo: © All rights reserved
Verre églomisé

Verre églomisé is a technique dating back to pre-Roman times, used to paint and gild the rear face of glass to produce a mirror finish. It was revived in France during the 18th century. Barbara’s intention is to bring Baroque opulence into the 21st century by combining this technique with contemporary minimalistic design. This piece was hand-blown and formed, sandblasted and gilded, the matt yellow exterior intensifying the extravagance of the golden interior.

13 cm
30 cm
23 cm

Barbara Nanning Glass sculptor
Photo: © All rights reserved
Coloured Shadows

Inspired by Claude Monet’s water lilies and the kimono designs of Itchiku Kubota, Barbara created a still life of shapes, shadows and colours. Tack-fusing cut sections of glass canes of varying patterns, colours and thickness, then encasing them in clear glass, she hand-blows the resulting sheet to create an irregular interplay of patterns spreading over the surface like blobs of oil on water.

17 cm
28 cm
27 cm

Barbara Nanning Glass sculptor
Photo: © All rights reserved
Coloured Shadows II

Inspired by Claude Monet’s water lilies and the kimono designs of Itchiku Kubota, Barbara created a still life of shapes, shadows and colours. Tack-fusing cut sections of glass canes of varying patterns, colours and thickness, then encasing them in clear glass, she hand-blows the resulting sheet to create an irregular interplay of patterns spreading over the surface like blobs of oil on water.

22 cm
35 cm
28 cm

Barbara Nanning Glass sculptor
Photo: © All rights reserved
Fossil Form

The inspiration for this unglazed sculpture came to Barbara during a study trip to Cappadocia in Turkey, a bleak landscape of soft eroded rocks and cliffs riddled with troglodyte dwellings. Its monochrome quality appealed to her, and she interpreted this captured emotion into a series of sandy spiral ceramic vessels.

Barbara Nanning Glass sculptor
Photo: © All rights reserved
Galaxy

Barbara’s work on the Galaxy series, started in the 1990s, marked a clear breakthrough in her designs. Rather than using engobes and glazes she turned to paint and pigments, cold finishes on cold materials. Distancing herself from the kiln, she did the unthinkable, assembling hand-thrown pieces of stoneware with epoxy resin.

Barbara Nanning Glass sculptor

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